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Dust Collection and Valves Blog

Why Do I Need an Airlock Valve for My Dust Collector

Posted by Tom Hobson on Nov 29, 2017 3:38:54 PM

In order for a dust collector to operate at its peak performance, the hopper has to be isolated from the outside.  This means either the dust bin/receptacle is “hard connected”, meaning there are no air leaks or an airlock is used.  An airlock isolates the dust collector hopper from the outside, while allowing the collected dust to exit the system.  Common airlocks are rotary valves, trickle valves, double dump valves, and knife gates.  Some airlocks are low leakage (double dump valve and trickle valves) while others have continuous leakage (rotary valves). 

Airlocks are important because without them air will enter (system under vacuum) or leave (pressurized system) through the dust discharge valve.  If the system is under vacuum, the air entering the system from the dust discharge will re-entrain the dust back into the clean air, thereby lowering removal efficiency.  If the system is under pressure, air will blow out of the bottom, spreading dust everywhere, creating unnecessary maintenance cost for the facility.

If the system is dealing with an explosive dust, an airlock should be used to prevent an explosion from propagating from the dust discharge flange.  Specially designed rotary valves are used to prevent this.

Furthermore, airlocks allow you to change the dust bin without shutting off the system.  If you don’t have an airlock, when you need to change your dust bin, you either have to turn off the system, or operate the unit without any isolation. 

So when you are spending money to capture your dust in a dust collector, don’t forget to put an airlock on it, so you will have the best performance possible.

Read our article on what type of airlock valves to use in particular applications.

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If you are having operational issues on your dust collection system, contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com.

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Topics: dust, gpc, airlocks, airlocks valve

Why You Should Pay Attention to Air Velocity in Your Dust Collection System

Posted by Tom Hobson on Nov 21, 2017 10:04:33 AM

If your air velocity is too low in your ductwork you could get dust dropping out in straight runs.  And dust collecting in ductwork is not a very good idea. 

  • It is a fire / explosion hazard. If your system has a low dust loading, small enough that there isn’t enough material to support an explosion (below MEC), dust collecting in the ductwork could put the system above the MEC, thereby making the system an explosion hazard.
  • Dust collecting in the ductwork causes the effective diameter of the ductwork to decrease. This causes the pressure drop through the system to increase, which will decrease the airflow through the system.  Lower airflow will cause more dust to escape the pickup hoods, thereby causing greater housekeeping, maintenance, etc.
  • Dust building up in ductwork will also cause your ductwork to weigh much more. Depending on the weight the supports were designed for, if too much dust builds up, your ductwork could fall down, thereby possibly creating a dust cloud that could be explosive.

If the air velocity is too high, the static pressure of your system will be high.  This will require you to operate the exhaust fan at a higher speed.  This could increase the noise, power used and wear and tear.  High air velocity could also increase the erosion of the ductwork, thereby developing holes in the ductwork which will leak air into the system and decrease the actual airflow at the pickup points.

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Watch for our upcoming article on sizing of ductwork for your dust collection system.

If you are having operational issues on your dust collection system, contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com.
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Topics: dust, gpc, Fan Wheels, Fan Impellers, velocity, air velocity

Are you wasting time using compressed air to clean your baghouse or cartridge collector?

Posted by Tom Hobson on Sep 13, 2017 10:27:35 AM

Baghouses and cartridge collectors often use compressed air / plant air to clean the filters.  By pushing compressed air through the filter, in theory, dust should be removed from the filters.  However,  air compressors are high maintenance pieces of equipment that have high operating costs.  Also, the filters are never completely dust free after an air blast, meaning that, over time they become blinded. This high time-and-monetary cost can be lowered by breaking away from using compressed air and instead using a cyclone pre-filter in your dust collection system.

 By putting a cyclone pre-filter ahead of your filters you can:

  • Decrease the loading on filters, reducing their cleaning from twice a minute to possibly once every 2-3 minutes.
  • Eliminate the wear and tear on your filters and therefore the risk of your filter developing a hole and compromising the whole filter.

If you are looking to save money on your compressed air usage, a pulse-on-demand controller with a cyclone pre-filter is a good option to explore.

Click below to see how baghouses or cartridge collectors used as pre-filters cyclones can significantly improve your process. 

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Contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com to help you problem-solve your dust collection problems.

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Topics: dust collector, baghouse, cartridge collector, Dr. Dust, compressed air

Hoods – Often Times the Most Important Component in a Dust Collection System

Posted by Tom Hobson on Aug 3, 2017 3:51:25 PM

Hoods are probably most important component in a dust collection system because they will:

  1. direct the dust away from the employees and equipment, even if the dust collector is not operating correctly
  2. allow dust to be captured at the lowest airflow possible, saving you money

If a hood is improperly designed it will not capture the dust from an application, no matter how well your dust collector or fan is designed.

A few things to remember on hood design:

  • Place the hood as close to the dust generating area / equipment as feasibly possible to lower the airflow required
  • Use the Industrial Ventilation Handbook to help you design / evaluate your hood
    1. Location
    2. Geometry
    3. Pickup velocity
  • If you use of local dampers for greater flexibility in the future remember they could allow un-intentional changes

Click here to get an easy how-to-guide for selecting the right dust collector for your specific application.

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If you have questions about your hood design or your dust collection systems our consultants are here to help.

Contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com to help you problem solve your dust collection problems.

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Topics: dust collector, Dr. Dust, hood

The Benefits of Using a VFD On a Dust Collection Exhaust Fan

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jul 26, 2017 11:11:38 AM

Variable Frequency Drives allows for you to control the airflow through your system by changing the fan speed without breaking the bank.  Without VFDs, one has to manually open or close dampers, creating high manual labor cost. Furthermore, if there are multiple dampers on the system, then tampering with the opening and closing of any one damper, can cause the airflow balance to be off and can increase the static pressure of the system.  

The VFD allows you to control the airflow of the fan, rather than allowing a constant high air output, as would be the case when dampers are being used. VFDs give the system the airflow that is required while lowering electrical costs.  VFDs can further lower costs by replacing motor starter control panels. All in all, using a VFD is the smart way to control your airflow.

 If you are having operational issues on your dust collection system contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com to help you problem solve your dust collection problems.


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Topics: dust collector, Dr. Dust, exhaust fan, vfd

How Important are Dampers in a Dust Collection System?

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jun 28, 2017 1:19:22 PM

Dampers are used in dust collection systems to control the airflow to specific branches of the ductwork.  This is done by opening or closing the damper.  Air, like water, travels the path of least resistance.  By using a damper, you are changing the resistance to the air.  Every dust collection system should have a manual damper near each hood/pickup point to balance the system.  This makes sure that the system is properly operating.  An unbalanced system could cause too much air to be pulled from one area (causing loss of product) while in another area not enough airflow is available to capture dust.  Other times, a soft connect (space between flanges) is used to control airflow at a pickup point.  However, this isn’t very efficient.  This keeps the airflow in that area constant, but it’s picking up air from an area where it isn’t required.  A damper would work much better, since you are only moving the air in the area you need.  Soft connects are only advantageous when you are looking to cool down an airflow using outside air.  Dampers can also be used to shut off portions of the system that are not being used, thereby allowing a smaller system.

 

So when you are looking at your dust collector system, don’t forget dampers.  They allow you to optimize your system.


 Having dust issues in your application?   Learn how the GPC can solve them!

If you are having operational issues on your dust collection system, contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com.

 

 


 

 

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Topics: dust collector, airflow, Cyclone Pre-Filter, Sudden change in airflow, Dr. Dust, exhaust fan, Damper

Which 4 major items can cause a dust collection system to underperform?

Posted by Tom Hobson on Jun 15, 2017 9:15:00 AM

Dust collection systems consist of four major items.  All of them are important and can cause a dust collection system to underperform.  The major items are the exhaust fan, dust collector, ductwork, and hoods/pickup points.   While the exhaust fan provides the motive power to collect the dusty air, its performance is affected by each of the components.  This means that if one of the other components isn’t operating as designed, the whole system will be affected.  Ductwork is usually by far the largest component and often the most overlooked.  Depending on the size of your system, the ductwork can span hundreds of feet and have dozens of side streams.  The ductwork is like railroad tracks, it moves the dusty air from one place to another.

Often times, additional lines will be added to a dust collector system after installation.  Without proper evaluation of the system, this could negatively affect the performance of the whole system.  This means that just because the dust collector system was operating correctly before, it might not after an additional pickup point or hood is added.  What happens is that when you add additional pickup points, you change the balancing of the system.  This could change the airflow to each and every hood and pickup point in the system, so while the system was originally adequately venting an area, it might not after a change.

A few things can be done to address this, such as changing fan speed, adding dampers, modifying ductwork, etc.  The main thing you need to keep in mind is that if you slow the airflow through ductwork too much, you begin to build up dust within the line.  This will further restrict your airflow and become a fire / explosion hazard.

So when you are looking at changing your dust collector system, review the system parameters or hire someone to review so that you do not cause additional issues.

Learn about the questions you should be asking to make sure you're buying the right dust collector for your application. Get your whitepaper now.

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If you are having operational issues on your dust collection system, contact Aerodyne at 440-543-7400 or dc@dustcollectorhq.com.

 

 


 

 

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Topics: dust collector, Cyclone Pre-Filter, Dr. Dust, Product Recovery, exhaust fan, Ductwork

Aerodyne At Ceramics Expo 2017

Posted by Tom Hobson on May 25, 2017 4:01:04 PM

Now in its third year, Ceramics Expo is the world's largest annual free-to-attend expo for the advanced ceramic and glass community.

The massively expanded event stands as a unique showcase for all the latest start materials, industrial equipment, technical ceramic components, processing expertise, analysis and testing devices, thermal technologies and precision finishing systems that keep this sector at the forefront of manufacturing advances.

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Due to its tightly focused approach and by maintaining a close relationship with all core stakeholders, Ceramics Expo guarantees the participation of respected and innovative suppliers. As the premier US ceramics exhibition, it draws in thousands of genuine decision makers and aims to set the agenda for ceramics manufacturing and applications.

Aerodyne Environmental's industrial dust collection products feature unique, low-maintenance designs that will enhance the performance of your processing operations. Our industrial dust collectors, which work horizontally or verticaly, can extend the life of your baghouse or cartridge filters. And, Aerodyne offers a variety of durable material handling valves for every application, including the Vacu-Valve Trickle Valve System, a cost-effective solution to rotary valves.

Aerodyne Environmental's industrial dust collection products feature unique, - See more at: http://www.dustcollectorhq.com/#sthash.ioeZwJ15.dpuf
Aerodyne Environmental's industrial dust collection products feature unique, - See more at: http://www.dustcollectorhq.com/#sthash.ioeZwJ15.dpuf
Aerodyne Environmental's industrial dust collection products feature unique, low-maintenance designs that will enhance the performance of your processing operations. Our industrial dust collectors, which work horizontally or vertically, can extend the life of your baghouse or cartridge filters. And, Aerodyne offers a variety of durable material handling valves for every application, including the Vacu-Valve Trickle Valve System, a cost-effective solution to rotary valves. - See more at: http://www.dustcollectorhq.com/#sthash.ioeZwJ15.dpuf
erodyne Environmental's industrial dust collection products feature unique, low-maintenance designs that will enhance the performance of your processing operations. Our industrial dust collectors, which work horizontally or vertically, can extend the life of your baghouse or cartridge filters. And, Aerodyne offers a variety of durable material handling valves for every application, including the Vacu-Valve Trickle Valve System, a cost-effective solution to rotary valves. - See more at: http://www.dustcollectorhq.com/#sthash.ioeZwJ15.dpuf
Aerodyne Environmental's industrial dust collection products feature unique, low-maintenance designs that will enhance the performance of your processing operations. Our industrial dust collectors, which work horizontally or vertically, can extend the life of your baghouse or cartridge filters. And, Aerodyne offers a variety of durable material handling valves for every application, including the Vacu-Valve Trickle Valve System, a cost-effective solution to rotary valves. - See more at: http://www.dustcollectorhq.com/#sthash.ioeZwJ15.dpuf
Aerodyne Environmental's industrial dust collection products feature unique, low-maintenance designs that will enhance the performance of your processing operations. Our industrial dust collectors, which work horizontally or vertically, can extend the life of your baghouse or cartridge filters. And, Aerodyne offers a variety of durable material handling valves for every application, including the Vacu-Valve Trickle Valve System, a cost-effective solution to rotary valves. - See more at: http://www.dustcollectorhq.com/#sthash.ioeZwJ15.dpuf
Aerodyne Environmental's industrial dust collection products feature unique, low-maintenance designs that will enhance the performance of your processing operations. Our industrial dust collectors, which work horizontally or vertically, can extend the life of your baghouse or cartridge filters. And, Aerodyne offers a variety of durable material handling valves for every application, including the Vacu-Valve Trickle Valve System, a cost-effective solution to rotary valves. - See more at: http://www.dustcollectorhq.com/#sthash.ioeZwJ15.dpuf

 

 

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Topics: Cyclone Pre-Filter, trickle valve, Ceramics Expo 2017, vacu-valve

Dust Collection Systems: Product Recovery and Cyclone Pre-filters

Posted by Tom Hobson on May 25, 2017 1:50:57 PM

If you are working with a high value material or product, then you should investigate using a cyclone ahead of your baghouse or cartridge collector.  The cyclone will allow you to recover the dust without contamination from the filters.  The filters in a baghouse or cartridge collector use a dust layer built up on the filters to collect the dust from the airstream.  During the process of filter cleaning, dust from this layer is dislodged and falls into the hopper.  Any particulate from prior batches can cause contamination of the dust.

Learn More About Using a Cyclone as a   Pre-Filter for Your Baghouse

A cyclone, on the other hand, collects the dust and deposits it in the hopper continuously.  There is very little dust buildup inside of a cyclone.  This minimizes the chances of contamination from prior batches.  Since there aren’t any filters, a cyclone can be washed or wiped out to remove the prior batch particles.

One area where this could be very helpful is pigment collection.  A baghouse or cartridge collector filter will collect the pigment and contaminate the color.  This requires the filters to be changed every time a new color is produced.  So the system will require a filter set for every different color produced.  Conversely, the cyclone can be washed out or wiped down between colors.  This saves in both maintenance time and spare parts costs.

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Topics: Cyclone Pre-Filter, Dr. Dust, Product Recovery

Dust Collection Systems: Dust Hazard Analysis (DHA) and NFPA 652

Posted by Tom Hobson on May 9, 2017 8:15:00 AM

With the release of NFPA 652 and 654, manufacturers that create dust in their processes are required to conduct a Dust Hazard Analysis if the dust is explosive.  NFPA 652 requires this to be done by 9/7/2018 but NFPA 654 has extended it 5 years.  The Dust Hazard Analysis is retroactive, so all manufacturers are required, no one is grandfathered in.

The DHA should be as simple or as complex as the process and needs to be documented for OSHA.  The main purpose of the DHA is to educate the owner and operators on the true hazards and dangers they are facing with their dust, and to make sure they take the proper precautions with it.  The DHA is there as a tool to prevent loss of life, equipment, production time, and capital.

Aerodyne will be addressing the DHA further in future Blogs!  Stay tuned.

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Topics: NFPA 652, DHA